The Nature Conservancy Receives $26 Million in Funding--one of the Largest Gifts to Conservation in Africa Commitment from the Peter Hawkins Dobberpuhl Foundation will benefit wild places and the people living in them

ARLINGTON, Va., March 4, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Nature Conservancy (TNC), a global non-profit organization, announced today receipt of $26 million in funding through the Peter Hawkins Dobberpuhl Foundation for projects in Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia that are designed to conserve wild places and benefit the people who live in them, with $3 million allocated specifically for work to combat the elephant poaching crisis. This is one of the largest gifts, other than through bequest, to on-the-ground conservation in Africa.

The Dobberpuhl family – Joel, Holly, and their children Samuel and Lily – chose to make their funding commitment a strategic combination of philanthropic giving and impact investment capital$22.5 million is outright philanthropy, and $3.5 million is a seven-year, zero-interest loan to scale up an innovative conservation financing program in Kenya focused on sustainable livestock grazing. The Dobberpuhls aim to encourage more philanthropists to engage in this blended funding strategy.

"TNC is doing the right thing by bringing their resources and expertise to the marketplace to make a greater conservation impact, but it is not without risk," said Joel Dobberpuhl. "Like any venture it is important to provide them with flexible capital. Innovation is alive in conservation and it's definitely alive at The Nature Conservancy."

This transformative funding support builds on generous support from the Peter Hawkins Dobberpuhl Foundation to TNC projects in their home state of Tennessee and second home, Washington state, where they support the Pacific Northwest's Emerald Edge program to protect the world's largest temperate rainforest.

"TNC's efforts in Africa are aimed at easing the tension between people and wildlife; helping to create a healthy balance for both – and that is one of the main reasons we wanted to participate," said Holly Dobberpuhl.

"The fact that a family from Tennessee is stepping up at this level is an indication of how important Africa is on a global scale for social and conservation causes. Populations are growing and demand for resources is increasing. It really is crunch time. If we're going to make it through, people in the U.S. and other parts of the world must also step up," said David Banks, Director of TNC's Africa Program.

For the entire release and details about the allocation of the Peter Hopkins Dobberpuhl Foundation funding to specific programs, please visit http://www.nature.org/newsfeatures/pressreleases/the-nature-conservancy-receives-26-million-in-fundingone-of-the-largest-gift.xml.

The Nature Conservancy is a leading conservation organization working in 35 countries to conserve lands and waters upon which all life depends. TNC and its more than 1 million members have conserved nearly 120 million acres worldwide. www.nature.org

SOURCE The Nature Conservancy



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