The Petroleum Technology Research Centre Releases Its Findings on the Petro-Find Geochem Ltd. Report Claiming Leaks of CO2 from the Weyburn EOR Field

Jan 19, 2011, 14:00 ET from Petroleum Technology Research Centre

REGINA, Jan. 19 /PRNewswire/ - The Petroleum Technology Research Centre (PTRC), on behalf of the IEAGHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project, today released an assessment of the Petro-Find Geochem Ltd. report ("Geochemical Soil Gas Survey: A Site Investigation of SW30-5-13-W2M Weyburn Field, Saskatchewan"), which claims that CO2 is leaking from the Weyburn oil field onto the Kerr family farm located at the southern limits of the oil field. The PTRC is a not-for-profit independent research organization and is the the technical manager of the IEAGHG Project.

A complete, and extensive review ofthe Petro-Find report  is available at the PTRC's Website at www.ptrc.ca

Researchers, engineers, geologists and geophysicists involved in the IEAGHG project have reviewed the Petro-Find report and concluded that it does not support its claim that "CO2 in soils of the Kerr property is clearly the anthropogenic CO2 injected into the Weyburn reservoir".  The IEAGHG Project includes researchers from 30 different Canadian and international universities, research councils, geological surveys, and consultancies. 

"The Petro-Find report was examined by experts who have been studying the Weyburn oil field for more than ten years," noted Dr. Malcolm Wilson, the Executive Director of the PTRC. "They examined every claim made in the report, from carbon isotope ratios said to be markers of the CO2 underground at Weyburn, to discussions of high CO2 readings in the soil, to claims of open faults.  They found no data in the report that can support the assertions that CO2 has migrated through the geological storage system to the surface."

Dr. Steve Whittaker, senior project manager, noted that the international research program at Weyburn is the world's largest and most extensive independent study of CO2 being stored in the sub-surface. 

"Soil survey baselines taken before CO2 began to be injected, and numerous published and peer-reviewed scientific papers, draw into question claims of unusually high readings on the Kerr property," said Whittaker.


SOURCE Petroleum Technology Research Centre