2014

Winterizing Your Ride...Again: A Ten Point Check List for the Over 100,000-Mile Vehicle AutoMD.com's Top Tips for Keeping High Mileage Cars Safe and Running on Winter Roads

 

 

CARSON, Calif., Dec. 1, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- As the winter driving season kicks into gear, more high mileage vehicles are hitting the road than ever before.  A report(1) from AutoMD.com reveals that the majority of car owners surveyed plan to hold onto their cars well past the 150,000 mile mark, and nearly 8 in 10 are planning to drive up to or over 50,000 more miles than they put on their previous vehicle. Plus, the average age of a vehicle in the US is a record 11 years! (2)

Fortunately, most cars on the roads today, even the high-mileage ones, have been built to last longer and withstand the test of time – and weather – provided they receive the proper care. This is especially important during the winter months when cold weather can take a toll on older vehicles.

"As drivers take to the roads this holiday season, we want to remind them to properly winterize their vehicles so that they don't find themselves stranded on a snowy roadside," said Brian Hafer, VP Marketing at AutoMD.com. "We encourage all drivers – especially those with older vehicles – to put their rides through AutoMD.com's ten point winter travel vehicle checklist. Simple maintenance can help lengthen vehicle life in the face of challenging weather, prevent an unexpected visit to the repair shop and costly repairs, and, importantly, ensure that car owners arrive at their winter destinations safe and sound."

AutoMD.com's Holiday Travel Winterizing Check List for Older Vehicles

  1. Check the antifreeze (coolant). The engine cooling system should be filled with a 50/50 mixture of antifreeze and distilled water to prevent freezing and boiling over. Antifreeze testers are available at your local auto parts store to test the mixture. To keep the cooling system operating at peak performance, follow the manufacturer's recommendations for changing the antifreeze (flush and fill). In addition to changing the antifreeze, pressure testing the cooling system on an older vehicle may expose a minor leak before it becomes a major problem. Most repair shops charge a minimal fee for pressure testing, and some shops will do it for free.
  2. Change the engine oil. Be especially meticulous about changing your car's fluids and filters during the winter months. Your car's older engine will thank you for it! Remember to change the oil and oil filter every 3,000 to 5,000 miles. Use the recommended oil viscosity range for winter. 5W-30 motor oil flows quicker in cold weather than 20W-50. Most vehicle manufacturers recommend 5W-30 oil for year round protection.
  3. Check the tires. Keep your vehicle riding smoothly and safely by maintaining your tires! Remember, there's a very good chance a third set of tires is needed if your vehicle has reached the 80 to 90,000 mile mark. Tires that are unevenly worn or out of balance can cause a car to pull or shake when driven, potentially damaging other components. Remember to rotate and balance your tires every other oil change; regularly check for uneven wear and try to keep them clean. Tires should be properly inflated, and the tread depth should be at least 4/32". Using snow tires can improve traction over all-season tires.
  4. Check the battery. Cold temperatures can reduce the battery's power. If the battery is older than four years, it may be time to replace it. Check the battery tray and hold down brackets for corrosion – a common problem on older vehicles.
  5. Check the belts and hoses. If your vehicle has a timing belt, it's very important to replace it at the recommended interval (60,000 miles or more). Cold weather can reduce the life expectancy of belts and hoses, so make sure yours are in good shape before getting on the road. A stretched timing belt affects engine performance, and a broken belt can leave you stranded. If you have an interference engine, a broken belt will also cause engine damage!
  6. Check the wipers and wiper fluid. Replace wipers that are old or worn, and (to prevent freezing) use windshield washer fluid instead of water. Just like the elderly, an aging vehicle needs clean glasses to see!
  7. Check the emergency kit. Make sure your kit is well stocked and add an ice scraper, tire chains, jumper cables, and warm clothes for winter weather emergencies. Remember to include a candle and matches, as well as some bottled water and energy bars. You can use a candle for light and warmth inside the vehicle if you get stranded.
  8. Check 4WD operation if equipped. Since you may not have used 4 Wheel Drive (4WD) all year, or in several years, make sure the 4WD is activated (review your manual on "how to activate") when you switch it on. Using 4WD improves traction in slippery conditions.
  9. Change your driving habits. Cars that are driven easy last longer. To prevent component wear and possible damage in very cold temperatures, warm up your car by driving it slowly to start. This will help the engine, transmission and other drive line components warm up with less stress. Avoid fast driving in general, hitting curbs, off-roading, and trailer towing as these can put unnecessary strain on your vehicle. Slow down and increase your following distance when driving in harsh weather. All vehicles lose traction in rain, snow and ice.
  10. Wash and wax your car. It is a good idea to get a good car wash and wax before heading out onto winter roads to protect your paint from road salt. And be sure to wash your car as soon as you return home, to remove any lingering road salt. As your vehicle ages, the paint/ finish becomes more vulnerable to the elements, which could lead to rust etc. so, if you can, keep your vehicle in the garage to protect it or consider a cover if you don't have a garage.

(1)  The AutoMD.com Mileage Survey was conducted in Q1 2011 among over 3,000 car owners: http://www.automd.com/about-automd/press/07-07-2011/

(2)  Polk.com data cited in The Detroit News, 8/16/11. In 2010, the average was 11 years old: www.polk.com/company/news/polk_in_the_news_motorists_holding_on_to_cars_longer_in_uncertain_economy

About AutoMD.com

AutoMD.com™ (www.automd.com), a wholly-owned subsidiary of US Auto Parts Network, Inc., (Nasdaq: PRTS), is the most comprehensive and unbiased free online automotive repair resource designed to empower car owners with the best way to repair their vehicles. Backed by a team of automotive data specialists and certified auto mechanics who are advocates for the car owner, AutoMD.com allows both car owners and DIYers to 1. Troubleshoot car problems, 2. Know how much auto repairs should cost, 3. Understand the steps needed and the time it should take with How-to Auto Repair guides, 4. Find the right local auto repair shop at the right price for their issue, and 5. Get auto repair questions answered by the AutoMD.com community. AutoMD.com was named Best Automotive Website in the 8th annual American Business Awards, also known as the as the Stevie® Awards. AutoMD Mobile is available for the iPhone at iTunes.

Contact:
Media Relations
Melanie Webber, mWEBB Communications, (424) 603-4340, melanie@mwebbcom.com
Angela Jacobson, mWEBB Communications, (714) 454-8776, angela@mwebbcom.com

SOURCE AutoMD.com



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